Messerschmitt Bf-109F2/4 1/72 Eduard

The Messerschmitt “hundred and nine” probably needs no introduction. Germany’s most famous fighter formed the backbone of the Luftwaffe’s fighter force. In the course of its development, it took part in battles from the Spanish Civil War to the last shots of the world conflict in May 1945. Despite all the changes and improvements, it has retained its distinctive look that has charmed many aviation and WWII aircraft fans.

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Avia S-199 Mule 1/72 Eduard

The Avia S-199 Mule was built as a temporary fighter using leftovers from the war production in the Protectorate of Bohemia and Moravia by fitting a Jumo 211F engine and a Junkers VS-11 propeller into the fuselage of a Messerschmitt Bf-109G-10. The nickname Mule fully describes what resulted. The same can be said of Eduard’s kit. A perfect kit and not so good decals 😉

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S-20.103 1/72 KP

In 1929 year, the Š-20.103 aircraft from the fourth production series was handed over to VLÚS (Military Aviation Institute of Studies) for a set of tests. It was used for a number of tests, including with a ski chassis. This particular machine was also modified to be a “photo plane”, where a cutout was made in the lower part of the fuselage for a photo chamber that partially extended outward.

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Letov S-20.57 1/72 KP

In 1926, the Czechoslovakian Army was conducting a series of complex military manoeuvres, which included a joint training with Czechoslovakian Air Force.
During the training, two opposite groups of aircrafts were created – the “Blues” belonging to LP2 located in Olomouc and “Reds” of LP1 located in Prague.
The plane I decided to build belonged to the Blues, which were equipped with Š-20s (designed by Ing. Antonín Šmolík), specifically Š-20.57 with registration number E1 from 33rd squadron of LP2.

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Hawker Hurricane Mk.IIc 1/72 Arma Hobby

For some, the iconic British World War II fighter is the Spitfire, but for me, it’s the Hawker Hurricane. I almost always think of the movie Battle of Britain when I look at it, and the picture of the victorious night fight of the Hurricane over the Heinkel 111, which comes from Mr. Velc and was printed on the Směr kit box in the eighties of the 20th century. Almost every boy who was making models back then had this particular black cannon-equipped Hurricane in his display case…

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Object 279 1/72 Takom

Object 279 was a sixty-ton prototype of a Soviet heavy tank developed in 1957-1959. The tank was characterized by very strong armor protection and its shape was intended to withstand the shock wave of a nuclear attack. It moved on four tracks with the possibility of changing the ground clearance of the vehicle, which should ensure high passability through difficult terrain. The armament consisted of an experimental 130-millimetre M-65 tank cannon with a rate of 5-7 rounds per minute, which was supposed to be able to penetrate the 300-millimetre-thick armour plate of the enemy. The cannon was equipped with Grozda stabilization and night vision, the range was 12,500 meters. A 14.5-millimeter KPVT heavy machine gun was coupled to the cannon. Only 3 prototypes were produced, serial production did not take place due to high costs and unsatisfactory test results. The only surviving example can be found in the Russian Tank Museum in Kubinka.

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B-36 Mosquito 1/72 Tamiya

The British de Havilland DH.98 Mosquito multipurpose aircraft was built in 1938-1940 and entered service in 1941. It was used as a light bomber, night and day fighter and reconnaissance aircraft. Its mostly wooden construction and high flight speed earned it the nickname “Wooden Wonder”. The Mosquitos FB Mk.VI and T.Mk.III were in the Czechoslovak service between 1945-1953 under designations B-36 (CB-36).

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